Archive for April, 2011

The Talent Trade

April 18, 2011

From University World News

There has been a lot of talk about the ‘brain drain’ phenomenon in higher education, whereby the brightest students and academics are attracted from East to West and from South to North. But as competition for students and academics has grown in countries such as India and China, there have been reports that this process may be going into reverse.

For example a just-published report by the leading business consultancy firm Frost & Sullivan predicts that there will be a steady flow of returning migrants to countries like India to fill vacancies for senior positions – and that they will be joined by Americans and Europeans seeking better prospects.

Universities are already beginning to see this reverse movement and analysts like Peggy Blumenthal and Rajika Bhandari of the Institute for International Education argue that there will be increasing mobility in higher education with ‘brain drain’ being replaced by ‘brain circulation’, ‘brain exchange’ or the ‘brain train’.

Check:

Brain reclaim’ as talent returns from West
Asian universities are rising and this coincides with a downturn in Western economies. The combination could promote greater internationalisation in higher education, but some fear that it could lead to long-term problems for Western universities which may have to do more to tackle what is being dubbed ‘brain reclaim’, reports Yojana Sharma.
Full report on the University World News site

Reverse brain drain takes off
The brain drain of international students to the US is slowly reversing as more international students opt to return to their home countries and some US students of immigrant parents choose to study abroad. The US may need to adapt its visa policies to compete, but countries in the developing world will also have to ensure they have enough to offer to keep returning students there, reports Alison Moodie.
Full report on the University World News site

Povl Tiedemann

April 2011

Distribution of Influence and obligations

April 17, 2011

Extracts from mongabay.com

Of the world’s largest 150 economic entities, 95 are corporations (63.3%) according to data released this month (July 2005) by Fortune Magazine and the World Bank. Wal-Mart, BP, Exxon Mobil, and Royal Dutch/Shell Group all rank in the 25 largest entities in the world, above countries that include Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, Norway, Denmark, Poland, South Africa, and Greece.

Comments:

What may be the consequences for maintaining the national Economic Governance and Socio-Political obligations?

Check:

http://news.mongabay.com/2005/0718-worlds_largest.html

(NB: 2005 data – but issues are actual)

Povl Tiedemann

April 2011

English proficiency ranking of 44 countries

April 10, 2011

By Yojana Sharm, University World News

With countries such as Britain and Australia tightening up on the level of English language skills for international student visas, students in some countries are having to invest a great deal more than others in improving language proficiency.

“Requiring English as the first foreign language results in high proficiency. There is, however, a strong correlation between the requirement of English for all students as the first foreign language and high English proficiency. Only Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway and Germany required English as the first foreign language for 100% of students between 1982 and 2000,” the just-released EF EPI report 2011 said.

Check:

Full report on the University World News site

EF EPI report 2011

Povl Tiedemann

April 2011

 

 

Misconceptions about internationalisation

April 10, 2011

From University World News

Internationalisation in higher education has become mainstream, but there is still a lack of clarity about what this involves.

HANS DE WIT describes what he sees as the nine misconceptions about internationalisation.

Check:
Full report on the University World News site

Povl Tiedemann

April 2011

Chinese Scientists Set to Lead the World

April 10, 2011

From China Daily, March 30, 2011, China News

LONDON – China has shot into second place in the world in terms of the number of scientific articles that are published in international magazines and the country’s scientists are set to take the top spot from the United States in the next few years, according to a new report.

“China has already overtaken the UK and is the second leading producer of research publications, but some time before 2020 it is expected to surpass the US,” said the report from the Royal Society in London.

Read Full Article HERE

Povl Tiedemann

April 2011

Strong science in Iran, Tunisia, Turkey

April 8, 2011

By Yojana Sharma and Wagdy Sawahel, University World News

Iran, Tunisia and Turkey are among a number of countries beginning to challenge the dominance of established powerhouses of scientific research, according to a major new report that has identified rapidly emerging nations “not traditionally associated with a strong science base”.

Check:
Full report on the University World News site

Povl Tiedemann

April 2011

Rector resigns over business school fiasco

April 3, 2011

By Ard Jongsma, University World News

Copenhagen Business School Rector Johan Roos tendered his resignation and was sent home last weekend as it emerged that a merger between his institution and private MBA provider SIMI was in conflict with Danish university legislation.

The merger had been carried out prematurely, anticipating approval, despite the rector’s knowledge that it was contestable. Current MBA students risk ending up with an expensive degree without the accreditation so critical in the world of MBAs.

Check:
Full report on the University World News site

Povl Tiedemann

April 2011

Defining a world class MBA

April 1, 2011

Extract from EFMD’s Global Focus.

Excellent MBA programmes are now found all over the world and not just, as was once the case, in America. Richard Barker provides a checklist of what makes a programme world class.

The MBA is an American creation and there was a time when all of the world’s leading business schools were American. Over time, however, several world-class MBA programmes have emerged internationally, first in Europe and more recently in Asia and elsewhere.

As the Financial Times writer Della Bradshaw has noted in the context of the FT’s MBA ranking, “in 1999, 20 of the top 25 schools were from the US, with the remaining five from Europe; however, in 2010 there are just 11 US schools in the top 25, a further 11 are in Europe and three in Asia”. In short, best practice has become more widely dispersed.

Benchmarked against America, however, the global market for business education remains greatly underdeveloped. One indicator of this comes from global GMAT test scores. In 2009 as many as 78% of scores were sent to American schools compared with 7% for the three leading European countries combined (Britain 4%; France 2%; Spain 1%) and with only 3% and less than 1% respectively for the potentially giant markets of India and China.

The potential for growth in business education outside America is obvious.

Check:

http://www.efmd.org/images/stories/efmd/globalfocus11/Issue_1_2011_rbaker_mba.pdf

Povl Tiedemann

April 2011

EU to launch ‘industrial’ PhD

April 1, 2011

By Jan Petter Myklebust, University World News

The European Commission is to launch a European Industrial Doctorate, or EID, based on a scheme that has operated in Denmark for some 40 years.

Check:
Full report on the University World News site

Povl Tiedemann

April 2011

Why Can´t M.B.A. Students Write?

April 1, 2011

By Diana Middleton, Higher Education Today

Corporate hiring managers are increasingly complaining that M.B.A. grads have terrible writing skills, and more b-schools are trying to address the problem.

Check:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703409904576174651780110970.html?mod=wsj_share_twitter

Povl Tiedemann

April 2011