Archive for October, 2011

Multi Disciplinarity between Social Sciences and Humanities

October 26, 2011

Position paper from DEA – Danish Business Research Academy

With this paper  (The Social Sciences and the Humanities) DEA would like to contribute to the debate about how the Social Sciences and the Humanities (SSH) can contribute to solving future challenges for Europe and realising the Innovation Union. This position paper will propose an improved integration of the SSH in the European Commission’s future framework for research and innovation (Horizon 2020).

The complexity of the Grand Societal Challenges demand alternative solutions and new ways to exploit our academic competences in the best and broadest way possible. We believe that these challenges must be solved with contributions from many sciences in an interdisciplinary way. This is not done by losing the Social Sciences and Humanities, but by using it.

Our work in improving the integration of SSH in a future framework for research is of Danish interest and our work is financially supported by The Danish Council for Strategic Research.

In 2012 Denmark will hold the Presidency of the Council of the European Union, where some of the major strategic decisions about Horizon 2020 will be discussed and determined. The intent of this position paper is to serve as input to the debate concerning the way the European Commission should support research in SSH.

Check:

The Social Sciences and the Humanities — use it don’t lose it

DEA – Danish Business Research Academy

NB:

Check:

Social science needs higher EU profile – By Jan Petter Myklebust:
A Danish think tank has called for a strengthened social sciences and humanities strand in the European Union’s flagship research programme, as Denmark prepares to take over the chairmanship of the European Commission.
Full report on the University World News site

and:

http://www.deanstalk.net July 21, 2006 for basics from Stanford University, also including technology in this development, together with the latest Coimbra Group Position Paper on http://www.coimbra-group.eu/ May 19, 2011, stating that “Innovation is not only linked to science and technology, but also to social organization and culture”.

Povl Tiedemann

October 2011

A sustainable model for business schools?

October 25, 2011

Kai Peters and Howard Thomas argue that the current business model of business schools is financially unstable and probably unsustainable

At the core of each business school, a dialectic takes place between two distinct purposes – the goal of producing knowledge and the goal of educating students. Individual institutions have different views.

At one end of the spectrum there are research-intensive institutions while at the other there are teaching-led or even research-less schools. Most schools are somewhere in between, leaving them with a dual system of purposes and corresponding metrics that are all too often contradictory and confusing rather than cohesive.

The choices that individual institutions have made broadly share one common element. They are, the authors believe, financially unstable and probably unsustainable. This article therefore seeks to explore the financial drivers of business schools on both the income and expenditure sides of the equation and highlight areas of distinct concern for business school finances.

Where does the money come from?

Check:

http://www.efmd.org/images/stories/efmd/globalfocus11/Issue_2_2011_kpeters_hthomas.pdf

Povl Tiedemann

October 2011

Global University Rankings and their impact, EUA report

October 23, 2011

Extracts from the Editorial:

EUA commissioned this report in response to the growth in international and national rankings, as a result of increasing questions from member institutions requesting information and advice on the nature of these rankings, because of the interest shown by national governments in ranking exercises, and finally in light of the European Commission’s decision to develop a ‘European ranking’.

The report focuses on international rankings and also refers to a number of other ongoing projects seeking to measure university performance. It describes and analyses the methodologies used by the main international rankings using only publically available and freely accessible information.

It is clear that despite their shortcomings, evident biases and flaws, rankings are here to stay. They ‘enjoy a high level of acceptance among stakeholders and the wider public because of their simplicity and consumer type information’ (AUBR Expert Group, 2009). For this reason it is important that universities are aware of the degree to which they are transparent, from a user’s perspective, of the relationship between what it is stated is being measured and what is in fact being measured, how the scores are calculated and what they mean.

However, it is important to underline that international rankings in their present form only cover a very small percentage of the world’s 17,000 universities, between 1% and 3% (200-500 universities),completely ignoring the rest.

The report confirms that most international rankings focus predominantly on indicators related to the research function of universities. Attempts to measure the quality of teaching and learning generally involve the use of proxies, often with a very indirect link to the teaching process, and are rarely effective.

The importance of links to external stakeholders and environments are largely ignored. Where existing data is used, it is often not used consistently, and reputational factors have in many cases disproportional importance. Taken together, this leads to an oversimplified picture of institutional mission, quality and performance, and one that lacks relevance for the large majority of institutions, especially at a time when diversification and individual institutional profiling are high on agendas across Europe.

Check for full report:

http://www.eua.be/pubs/Global_University_Rankings_and_their_Impact.pdf

Povl Tiedemann

October 2011

How to create a world-class university

October 18, 2011

By Yojana Sharma, University World News
Although some of the world’s top-ranked institutions such as Harvard, Cambridge and Oxford are hundreds of years old, a series of case studies of successful world-class research universities, prepared by the World Bank, shows that a faster and more effective approach to achieving world-class status is to establish a new institution.

Check: Full report on the University World News site

Povl Tiedemann

October 2011

Competition and Cooperation Between Europe and China

October 12, 2011

EFMD, Brussels and CEIBS, Shanghai are joining forces to bring together experts from the corporate, political and academic arena to Brussels to discuss competition and cooperation between Europe and China.

The presentations and discussions will focus on the political framework of China’s role in the world and its relationship with Europe. Chinese as well as European companies need to understand this political framework and be able to work with it if they wish to be successful in international markets.

More specific issues will be discussed, including mergers and acquisitions, corporate growth and development set into perspective through strong corporate input from Chinese and European company case stories.

This will allow representatives from the academic world to reflect on how students can be prepared to support organizations in the future.

Check for further information: http://www.efmd.org/china

Povl Tiedemann

October 2011

 

Lessons from China

October 12, 2011

What makes global leaders succesful – and what makes them fail?

Extracts from article by Professor Nandani Lynton.

Do effective global leaders, especially those working in China, adopt an Eastern way of thinking that allows them to develop superior intellectual, emotional, cultural and spiritual attributes? Nandani Lynton believes they might well.

Senior leaders in all organizations carry a heavy responsibility but working globally brings particular stresses – thus effective global leadership rests on 4 Q’s:

IQ for intelligence quotient – reflects the ability to think in complex ways and in complex systems.

EQ for emotional intelligence – includes empathy, social stability, openness, passion, confidence, awareness of self and others, and authenticity.

CQ for cultural intelligence – concerns cultural acumen or the ability to feel one’s way into another context without judging too quickly.

SQ for spiritual intelligence – refers to feeling connected and part of a larger whole.

Focusing specifically on Western executives who are extraordinary successful in China, these leaders have adapted to local culture and, by doing so, have changed the way their brains work.

The executives had in common that they set aside time every day to reflect – to think about what was going on around them, to consider their own actions and to check whether they were on the right path.

Check full article on:

http://www.efmd.org/images/stories/efmd/globalfocus10/Issue_2_2010_nlynton.pdf

Check further references and initiatives on this subject via:

http://www.efmd.org/china

Povl Tiedemann

October 2011

 

 

 

 

Danish online network to recruit Chinese talent

October 2, 2011

Denmark last week launched the first-ever website to enable talented Chinese students and professionals to connect directly with Danish universities and firms, reports Xinhua according to news release from University World News :

Backed by top Danish companies and universities, the Sino-Danish Network aims to become a platform for Danish companies to recruit from the pool of future Chinese talent, the Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

To promote itself, the Sino-Danish Network is also opening accounts in two of China’s most popular social media sites, Sina Weibo and Renren, according to the statement. For Chinese students and professionals, the website would offer an opportunity to make themselves directly visible to Danish universities and companies, it said.

Check: Full report on the People’s Daily online

Povl Tiedemann

October 2011

The world’s talent pool is changing

October 2, 2011

By Yojana Sharma, University World News

Unabated expansion of higher education in developing countries and emerging economies has meant that the global graduate talent pool is no longer predominantly in the US and Europe, according to the Paris-based Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

Check: Full report on the University World News site

Povl Tiedemann

October 2011