Archive for May, 2012

Online higher education for the masses

May 27, 2012

Stephen Carson and Jan Philipp Schmidt

The term ‘massive open online course’, or MOOC (coined by Dave Cormier and Bryan Alexander) describes courses that take place online; are open in the sense that participation is typically free of charge and learning materials can be modified, reused and distributed to others; and reach massive communities – of tens of thousands – of learners.

MOOCs are a relatively new phenomenon, but they recently captured public attention when Stanford University launched a set of free online courses.

Sebastian Thrun, one of the MOOC pioneers at Stanford, created the artificial intelligence course that attracted more than 160,000 users (though only 25,000 finished the course).

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120525135513146

Povl Tiedemann

May 2012

Lessons from China

May 26, 2012

From EFMD  – Global Focus:

John Quelch discusses his first year as dean of CEIBS with George Bickerstaffe and Matthew Wood, including following statement: “Many Chinese ask: Can Chinese innovate? – I have no doubt that when they are no longer able to make money by imitating, they will turn to make money by innovating”

Check EFMD Global Focus, Vol. 6 issue 2 on:

http://issuu.com/efmd/docs/global_focus_vol_06_issue_02_online_new/1

Povl Tiedemann

May 2012

Scandinavian countries top the world in research

May 20, 2012

By Geoff Maslen, University World News

The world’s smaller developed nations, particularly in Scandinavia, have high levels of R&D support and this goes hand-in-hand with international collaboration and results in high-impact research results, according to a new study.

The impact of research from these countries is as good as or better than for larger countries such as the United States, France, Germany and Canada, the study found. The larger nations have lower levels of international collaboration than the smaller nations of Europe and Scandinavia.

At the request of Australia’s Chief Scientist Professor Ian Chubb, Alan Pettigrew, an adjunct professor in the college of medicine, biology and environment at the Australian National University, compared OECD figures published last September for Australia and 12 other countries: Austria, Belgium, Britain, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Norway, Sweden and the US.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=2012051713591328

and the reportAustralia’s Position in the World of Science, Technology & Innovation

http://www.chiefscientist.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/OPS2-OECD-for-web-FINAL.pdf

Povl Tiedemann

May 2012

Manufacturing Strikes Back – Criterion of the Month from IMD

May 15, 2012

Why “Made in” makes a country more competitive

By professor Stéphane Garelli, Director of IMD’s  World Competitiveness Center

After a golden age of ultra-globalization, the new buzzword is reindustrialization. In this new era, the ability to manufacture locally will be crucial to a country’s competitiveness.

The shift will be seen most clearly in the world’s wealthier economies – the US, Western Europe and Japan. After decades in which the share of industry in their GDP fell sharply, CEOs and politicians alike are rediscovering the benefits of manufacturing.

It’s not hard to see why.

Companies want more control over their supply chains, which have become too long, too complex and too vulnerable to shocks such as the tsunami in Japan and floods in Thailand.

And with Chinese and Indian labor costs increasing by around 15% a year, outsourcing is less cost-effective than it was.

Check:

http://www.imd.org/research/challenges/competitiveness-reindustrialization-manufacture-local-stephane-garelli.cfm?MRK_CMPG_SOURCE=wcc_1512050&utm_source=DM&utm_medium=em&utm_campaign=WCC_12_DME_1512050

Povl Tiedemann

May 2012

New ranking system rates countries not universities

May 14, 2012

By Geoff Maslen, University World News

A novel system of ranking 48 countries and territories said to be the ‘best’ at providing higher education was published on Friday by Universitas 21, the 15-year-old global network of 23 research-intensive universities.

The latest ranking system makes a welcome change from the efforts of a growing number of commercial organisations and other groups to rank individual universities according to their various abilities.

The top 10 countries claimed to be best at delivering higher education are the US, Sweden, Canada, Finland, Denmark, Switzerland, Norway, Australia, The Netherlands and the UK.

The Universitas 21 results were launched at an event at Lund University in Sweden, where the ranking system was described as a “benchmark for governments, education institutions and individuals”.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120511094921519

Povl Tiedemann

May 2012

Universities hold the key to economic growth

May 14, 2012

By Professor Sir Leszek Borysiewicz, vice-chancellor of the University of Cambridge, stating that:

“Big discoveries come from blue-skies research – One reason for this is that the discoveries that make the biggest contribution economically tend to result from blue-skies, fundamental research, not applied, ‘near-market’ research.”

Universities are not about being a research and development branch of Big Industry. Research is their primary objective and it is impossible to sort applied from yet-to-be-applied research. Universities have a public duty to serve society, not just to cater to its economic needs, and also to ask fundamental questions about the nature of our world.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120509134452129

Povl Tiedemann

EUA promotes full costing in Horizon 2020 Rules for Participation

May 13, 2012

EUA presented its input statement on the proposed Rules for Participation in Horizon 2020 at the EUIMA Project Final Event on “Horizon 2020 and the modernization of European universities – Dialogue with European policy makers” that took place on 10 May in Brussels.

EUA welcomes the fact that the proposal foresees 100% reimbursement of direct costs, since this is an important element in fostering funding on a full cost basis and supports the financial sustainability of universities. It also recognises the EC’s intention to simplify the funding rules of the programme and its aim to achieve a better balance between control and trust.

However, the analysis carried out by EUA has shown that the EC proposal for a single reimbursement rate (100% of direct costs and a flat rate of 20% for indirect costs or 70% / 20% depending on the type of project), does not achieve the necessary balance between reducing complexity and responding to the real needs of different actors.

EUA’s calculations show that a 20% flat rate is too low and does not sufficiently cover the actual indirect project costs. Therefore, EUA believes a single reimbursement rate with a 20% flat rate for indirect costs would discourage universities that have already implemented full costing and would hinder the further development of full costing methodologies and therefore also be to the detriment of greater transparency of public spending.

Check:

http://www.eua.be/Libraries/Policy_Positions/EUA_Input_to_the_Debate_on_the_Rules_for_Participation_in_Horizon_2020.sflb.ashx

Povl Tiedemann

May 2012

Are you prepared for the arrival of ‘glocal’ students?

May 10, 2012

By Rahul Choudaha, University World News

By 2015 nearly 100 million people will enter the ‘consumer class’, denoting those with an annual income of more than $5,000, in six South East Asian countries – Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam – according to a report by the Boston Consulting Group.

Another report, by the McKinsey Global Institute, asserts that between 2005 and 2025, China and India alone will see their aggregate urban consumption increase seven-fold and six-fold, respectively.

This expanding consumer class in Asia will give rise to a new segment of students who are willing to pay for a global educational experience while staying in their home country or region. I call this segment ‘glocals’ – people who have global aspirations, but need to stay local.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120424141501882

Povl Tiedemann

May 2012

Six-fold return for economy on university innovation funding

May 6, 2012

By Brendan O’Malley, University World News.

Extracts from news release:

Every pound invested in higher education innovation funding adds at least £6 (US$9.70) in knowledge exchange income to the economy, according to a new report sponsored by the Higher Education Funding Council for England, or HEFCE, and launched on 30 April.

The report, Strengthening the Contribution of English Higher Education Institutions to the Innovation System: Knowledge exchange and HEIF funding, draws on institutional strategies submitted to HEFCE.

It comes at a time when the role of higher education institutions in supporting economic growth and development has taken centre stage as governments around the world push for private-sector led, innovation-driven economic recoveries from the current, deep economic downturn.

The report, published by Public and Corporate Economic Consultants (PACEC), concludes that knowledge exchange is now embedded within the sector and has become a strategic, integrated activity, driven in part by the research impact agenda.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120503160642472

NB:

According to Danish research findings, increasing the number of individuals possessing a higher education by 1 pct. point will increase GNP by 1 pct. – check Danish Business Research Academy, DEA, 25 March 2010:

http://dea.nu/content/mere-og-bedre-uddannelse

Povl Tiedemann

May 2012

Students seek special treaty to increase mobility

May 3, 2012

Extracts from the April 2012 meeting on the Bologna process in Bucharest.

By Alan Osborn, University World News.

Europe’s students cited funding of student mobility as “the most contentious issue on the agenda” as ministers met to discuss the Bologna process on 26-27 April.

They put a demand for more cash and a new special mobility treaty to achieve movement of students and academics, on the ministerial agenda.

The 2012 report on Bologna with Student Eyes from the European Students’ Union (ESU) finds much wrong with the state of higher education in Europe but focuses on the lack of proper and adequate funding as “the most significant obstacle to mobility”, especially for students from less well-off backgrounds.

Check for further info.:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120426152342160

Check “Bologna with Student eyes 2012”:

http://www.esu-online.org/asset/News/6068/BWSE2012-online1.pdf

Povl Tiedemann

May 2012