Archive for September, 2012

Tracking of university students’ and graduates’ progression paths in Europe

September 25, 2012

By European University Association – extracts from news release

EUA published last week (38) a new study entitled ‘Tracking Learners’ and Graduates’ Progression Paths – TRACKIT’.

The outcome of a two-year EUA-led project, it maps the state of play in 31 countries, and provides factual information on the uses and methods for ‘tracking’ students’ progress at both the national level and within higher education institutions.

It is based on a qualitative survey in 31 countries, a series of focus groups, and site visits to 23 European universities in 11 countries.

The study has found that there is a growing interest in tracking and an increasing number of initiatives both at national and institutional level.

National-level initiatives for student tracking are in place in 23 of the higher education systems considered by the project, and in 26 systems for graduate tracking.

Some countries have adopted centralised tracking approaches while others have adopted ‘shared approaches’, where universities participate in the design and implementation of centrally-led approaches.

Check:

http://www.eua.be/Libraries/Publications_homepage_list/EUA_Trackit_web.sflb.ashx

Povl Tiedemann

September 2012

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Business of Branding 2012 – Why does your business school brand matter?

September 21, 2012

From EFMD Newsletter No 16

Business schools have operated in an increasingly competitive international market for much of the last decade. So how does a student choose what and where to study?

The Business of Branding study from Carrington Crisp, with the support of EFMD & ABS, provides an overview of international trends as well as offering individual business schools insights in to how they are perceived, their strengths and weaknesses, what students are ‘buying’ and where to get best value from their marketing spend.

The Executive Summary provides an overview of some of this year’s major trends as well as contrasting those findings with data from previous years. The study was first run in 2004 and since then more than 100 business schools have taken part from 25 countries with over 70,000 respondents completing the research.

Check:

http://www.efmd.org/images/stories/efmd/Blog/bus%20of%20brand%20exec%20summary%202012%20pdf.pdf

Povl Tiedemann

September 2012

OECD urges nations to boost spending on education

September 16, 2012

By Geoff Maslen, University World News

Spending on education by countries around the world is rising but access to higher education remains unequal, says the latest OECD report, Education at a Glance 2012.

It says governments should increase investment in early childhood programmes and maintain reasonable costs for higher education in order to reduce inequality, boost social mobility and improve people’s employment prospects.

The report reveals stark differences between nations in the opportunities they offer their young people to enter higher education, notably for children of poor families or whose parents have had a limited education.

Releasing the report on Tuesday (2012-09-11), OECD Secretary General Angel Gurría said nations needed an increasingly educated and skilled workforce in order to succeed in today’s knowledge economy. He said investing from an early age was crucial to lay the foundations for later success.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120912074100674

Povl Tiedemann

September 2012

Investing in people, skills and education for growth and jobs

September 16, 2012

By OECD Secretary General Angel Gurría – Extracts from University World News

For some time now, the global education and economic landscapes have been in a state of rapid transformation, spurred in significant part by two key changes.

The first is the continued ascent of the knowledge economy, which has created powerful new incentives for people to build their skills through education – and for countries to help them do so.

The second phenomenon – closely related to the first – is the explosive growth of higher education worldwide, which has increased opportunities for millions and is expanding the global talent pool of highly educated individuals.

This year’s Education at a Glance examines these landscapes in the light of another important change: the full onset of the global recession in 2009 and 2010.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120913121509927

Povl Tiedemann

September 2012

Who studies abroad and where?

September 16, 2012

From OECD’s 2012 Education at a Glance – Extracts from University World News

In 2010, more than 4.1 million tertiary students were enrolled outside their country of citizenship. Luxembourg, Australia, the United Kingdom, Austria, Switzerland and New Zealand have, in descending order, the highest percentages of international students among their tertiary enrolments.

In Luxembourg, high mobility is due to strong integration with neighbouring countries, according to the OECD’s 2012 Education at a Glance report published last week (2012-09-11). This is an extract from the report.

In absolute terms, the largest numbers of foreign students are from China, India and Korea. Asian students represent 52% of foreign students enrolled worldwide.

The number of foreign students enrolled in OECD countries was almost three times the number of citizens from an OECD country studying abroad in 2010. In the 21 European countries that are members of the OECD, there were 2.7 foreign students per each European citizen enrolled abroad.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120913154013258

Povl Tiedemann

September 2012

Increasing levels of education around the world

September 16, 2012

From OECD’s 2012 Education at a Glance – Extracts from University World News

Within most OECD countries, the percentage of 25- to 34-year-olds with tertiary attainment is moderately to considerably higher than the percentage of 55- to 64-year-olds with tertiary attainment. Exceptions to this trend include Germany, Israel and the United States.

In 2010, 25 OECD countries had upper secondary attainment rates of 80% or more among 25- to 34-year-olds, according to the OECD 2012 Education at a Glance report. The following is an extract from the report.

Educational attainment is a commonly used proxy for the stock of human capital – that is, the skills available in the population and the labour force.

As globalisation and technology continue to reshape the needs of the global labour market, the demand for individuals who possess a broader knowledge base, more specialised skills, advanced analytical capacities, and complex communication skills continues to rise.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120913154243755

Povl Tiedemann

September 2012

Fees and public support for tertiary students

September 16, 2012

From OECD’s 2012 Education at a Glance – Extracts from University World News

OECD and G20 countries vary significantly in the amount of tuition fees charged by their tertiary institutions. For instance, in eight OECD countries, public institutions charge no tuition fees, but in one-third public institutions charge annual fees in excess of US$1,500 for national students.

Countries with high levels of tuition fees tend to be those where private entities (for example, enterprises) also contribute the most to funding tertiary institutions, according to the OECD’s 2012 Education at a Glance report. This is an extract from the report.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120913154615429

Povl Tiedemann

September 2012

What do transnational education students really want?

September 15, 2012

By Yojana Sharma, University World News

Students involved in transnational education – learning in a different country from where the degree-awarding institution is based – are less concerned about the awarding institution’s reputation and more about a flexible learning environment and a close fit in terms of subjects available for study.

The British Council’s Education Intelligence Unit’s just-released Portrait of a Transnational Education Student, based on more than 160,000 student responses from 2007 until September 2012, found that students intending to study for a transnational education (TNE) degree valued the practicality of combining study with employment above the reputation, brand or ranking of the awarding institution.

“This runs contrary to popular belief that the awarding institution’s rank and reputation are what primarily attract students. This isn’t to say that students do not care about brand; it is simply not the most important factor,” the report noted.

“Five years ago students were really interested in the reputation of the institution but not any more,” Zainab Malik, research manager for the British Council in Hong Kong, told University World News.

“This reflects a greater level of trust in the quality of TNE degrees.”

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20120906201258968

Check also:

Who is today’s transnational student?

‘Glocals’ see transnational education as a means of developing their professional profile and networks – higher education institutions should respond likewise, says Elizabeth Shepherd on:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/blog/2012/sep/10/transnational-student-profile-careers-networks

Povl Tiedemann

September 2012

 

IMD Criterion of the Month: Fighting complexity with complexity?

September 13, 2012

By Stephane Garelli, Professor, Director, IMD’s World Competitiveness Center

Over the past decade, the complexity of the financial world had become such that there is little surprise that operations went out of control.

However, the incredible complexity of the regulatory measures aimed at overseeing financial institutions is probably adding to the problem rather than solving it.

The Basel III agreement is now 616 pages long, almost 10 times more than Basel I. The Dodd Frank act in the US runs over 848 pages. As part of it, the Volcker Rule on proprietary trading contains 383 questions and 1420 sub questions…

Who can survive this?

The cost and time implied for companies and regulatory bodies is getting out of hands. More and more people now raise their concern that such rules are simply unmanageable and will probably not catch all the problems.

And they come on the top of the national legal and regulatory rules, the criterion of this month.

In the words of Andrew Haldane, executive director at the Bank of England: “As you do not fight fire with fire, you do not fight complexity with complexity!”

Check:

http://www.imd.org/uupload/dm/files/WCC/legal.pdf

Povl Tiedemann

September 2012

The World’s Most Innovative Companies 2012 – Extract from INSEAD Knowledge

September 11, 2012

By Jeff Dyer & Hal Gregersen

Why are some companies able to create and sustain a high innovation premium while others don’t?

The answer is not complicated: People, process, and philosophies (what we call the 3Ps). They differentiate the best in class from the next in class when it comes to keeping innovation alive and delivering an innovation premium year after year.

On the people front, the behaviour of leaders matters—big time. In our initial study on disruptive innovators published with Clayton Christensen in The Innovator’s DNA, we found five “discovery skills” that distinguished innovators from non-innovators.

  • Innovators ask provocative questions that challenge the status quo.
  • They observe the world like anthropologists to detect new ways of doing things.
  • They network with people who don’t look or think like them to gain radically different perspectives.
  • They experiment to relentlessly test new ideas and try out new experiences.
  • Finally, these behaviours trigger new associations which allow them to connect the unconnected, thereby producing disruptive ideas.

Check list of companies:

http://www.forbes.com/innovative-companies/list/?utm_source=INSEAD+List&utm_campaign=3f5cd84337-News_Alert_Most_Innovative_Companies&utm_medium=email

Check full article:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/innovatorsdna/2012/09/05/how-innovative-leaders-maintain-their-edge/?utm_source=INSEAD+List&utm_campaign=3f5cd84337-News_Alert_Most_Innovative_Companies&utm_medium=email

Povl Tiedemann

September 2012