Archive for October, 2013

China’s shift to strategic international research collaboration

October 28, 2013

By Yojana Sharma, University World News

A shift is underway in China from making a mark globally as a research power, towards an increasingly strategic ‘innovation diplomacy’ that is shaping “the spread and intensity of its global research and innovation relationships”, according to a new study.

The report by NESTA, formerly the non-profit National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts in the United Kingdom, notes that “an ever-intensifying web of international connections has spread across every aspect of China’s innovation system – from joint academic research to technology transfer and licensing, foreign direct investment, mergers and acquisitions.

Check:
http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20131015152042488

Povl Tiedemann
October 2013

Why do international students go to China?

October 27, 2013

By Andrys Onsman, associate professor at the University of Melbourne – in University World News

With the increased standing of Chinese universities in international rankings, there has been a corresponding increase in students moving to study in China. Nowadays, China hosts a little less than 10% of all international students and this figure is likely to rise.

As an example, the aim of the Institute of International Education is to have 100,000 American students studying courses in China by 2014.

Check:
http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20131022125122189

Povl Tiedemann
October 2013

Reinventing higher education – MOOCs, SPOCs and hubs

October 26, 2013

By Paul Rigg, University World News

Massive open online courses, SPOCs – Self Paced Open Courses that may become MOOCs – and university hubs generated most interest at the fourth annual international conference on “Reinventing Higher Education”, which took place in Spain from 7-8 October.
(by IE – Instituto de Empresa SL).

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=2013102415264928

http://www.rhe.ie.edu/

Povl Tiedemann
October 2013

EUA – Making sense of the MOOCs – not a threat to universities

October 23, 2013

Making sense of the MOOCs

From EUA Newsletter 18 – Report from ACA-EUA Seminar in Brussels (10 October)

Around 150 participants, including representatives from higher education institutions and associations, public authorities, quality assurance agencies and the media, gathered last week for the Academic Cooperation Association (ACA)-EUA Seminar “Making Sense of the MOOCs”.

The event was designed to enable participants to discuss and find out more about the development and potential impact of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), which have been developing rapidly and are creating much discussion and debate in Europe and further afield. Speakers at the event included representatives from HE institutions in Europe and the US, MOOC platforms and representatives from ACA and EUA.

While the initial development of MOOCs was largely concentrated in the US, there has recently been a sharp increase in the number of European HE institutions offering them. According to the European MOOC scorecard on the EC’s Open Education Europa website there were more than 250 MOOCs across Europe at the end of August.

Check:
http://www.eua.be/News/13-10-18/Making_sense_of_the_MOOCs_-_report_from_ACA-EUA_Seminar_in_Brussels_10_October.aspx

MOOCs not a threat to universities – Policy seminar

By Carmen Paun, University World News

Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, are not a threat to bricks-and-mortar universities – as some in Europe fear – a seminar held in Brussels by the Academic Cooperation Association and the European University Association heard.

One reason that should reassure universities is the difference between students who study on campus and those who choose to study through MOOCs.

“The profile of MOOCs users is not the usual undergraduate profile,” said Tim Gore, director for global networks and communities at the University of London International Programmes. According to Gore, most students engaged in a MOOC already have a degree, are employed and are older – usually in their 30s.

Moreover, MOOCs can neither replace the social experience students have on campus nor the support and tutoring they receive from professors, agreed participants at the 10 October policy seminar on “Making Sense of the MOOCs”.

Check:
http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20131016155644111

Povl Tiedemann
October 2013

Academic inbreeding can discourage research sharing and production

October 18, 2013

Understanding the pros and cons of academic inbreeding

By Hugo Horta, researcher at the Technical University of Lisbon – in University World News

Academic inbreeding, which discourages mobility between institutions, has a damaging effect on research sharing and production. However, it is a complex issue to address and universities need to be clear about what the benefits and disadvantages are in any given situation.

Check:
http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20131009120224656

Povl Tiedemann
October 2013

INSEAD Knowledge – the crisis of trust

October 17, 2013

Gianpiero Petriglieri, Associate Professor of Organisational Behaviour at INSEAD and nominated for the Thinkers50 2013 “Future Thinker Award,” comments on the crisis of trust facing today’s leaders, and how to resolve it.

Check:
http://knowledge.insead.edu/leadership-management/organisational-behaviour/inseads-global-thought-leaders-gianpiero-petriglieri-2891#RL63vJMJUWjf80S4.99

Povl Tiedemann
October 2013

Understanding international student segments

October 16, 2013

International student recruitment via informed choice

By Rahul Choudaha, director of research and strategic development at World Education Services, New York – in University World News

Higher education institutions need to better understand their target markets in international student recruitment, and keep ahead of the game in terms of how the market is changing and adapting to new technologies and economics.

Higher education institutions are increasingly expected to make tough, strategic choices to achieve their internationalisation goals in a cost-effective manner.

For example, in the field of international student recruitment, institutions are often confronted with questions like:

• Which countries and cities should we prioritise in terms of our recruitment efforts?
• Which segment of students should we recruit?
• Which recruitment channels should we use?

Check:
http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20131008131743111

Povl Tiedemann
October 2013

Denmark expands HE collaboration with ‘growth countries’

October 14, 2013

By Jan Petter Myklebust, University World News

Jan Petter Myklebust reports on a mapping exercise to measure collaboration and student exchange between universities in Denmark and those in ‘growth countries’, as the government encourages higher education internationalization:

Collaboration increasing with ‘growth countries’

The appeal of Denmark as a destination for international students is steadily growing as collaboration and exchange increase between the country’s universities and higher education institutions abroad. Now the government is turning its attention to ‘growth countries’.

Thanks to the Danish Higher Education Ministry’s plan to increase internationalization, and its focus on growing the numbers of exchange students, there’s been a marked surge in cross-country studies.

The ministry said it had now mapped out cooperation between Danish universities and colleges and in nine ‘growth countries’.

Check:
http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20131009141943869
http://fivu.dk/publikationer/2013/uddannelsessamarbejde-med-vaekstlande

Povl Tiedemann
October 2013

Vikings, trade, trust, conduct and GDP

October 12, 2013

Wealth and democracy in Scandinavia is developed through trade, trust and conduct. When the Vikings ventured they left their gods behind and adapted to local conditions.

Check article (in Danish) in Videnskab dk:

The Vikings have given Denmark a high GDP?

Danes are very confident, happy and rich. The reason may be traced a thousand years back in Denmark’s history, when the Vikings ravaged Europe.

Via:
http://videnskab.dk/kultur-samfund/har-vikingerne-givet-danmark-et-hojt-bnp

Povl Tiedemann
October 2013

IMD – Criterion of the Month: The cost of productivity

October 11, 2013

By Stephane Garelli, Professor, Director, IMD’s World Competitiveness Center

Very few people realize that one of the lowest levels of unemployment in the world is to be found in Thailand: 0.7% overall and only 2.4% for the 16-24 years old.

Of course there is a snag: Thailand has a lot of “under-employed”, workers who are not fully occupied. But at least they have a job. As a consequence the level of labor productivity, defined as GDP(ppp) per person employed per hour, US$ – the criterion of this month – is very low: 7.10$.

But is it that bad?

Check:
http://www.imd.org/wcc/criterion-of-the-month/

Povl Tiedemann
October 2013