Archive for November, 2013

Horizon 2020 – Europe’s grand research funding scheme

November 28, 2013

By Keith Nuthall in University World News

The European Parliament voted last Thursday on the final version of the union’s record research and innovation programme for 2014-20, dubbed Horizon 2020. The European Union (EU) has allocated €79 billion (US$106 billion) to spend on research and innovation projects, not just on the continent but also around the world.

The European University Association, or EUA, welcomed the 21 November approval by the parliament.

Speaking to University World News, Dr Lidia Borrell-Damián, the EUA’s director of research and innovation, said the overall increase in funding over the €54 billion assigned to the outgoing EU Seventh Framework Programme – FP7 – for research was “very welcome”.

Even at 2011 prices, the budget has gone up – to €70 billion – at a time when the EU budget overall is facing real-time reductions.

Check:
http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20131122121945753

together with HORIZON 2020 Kick-Off-Presentation on this blog, November 1st 2013.

Povl Tiedemann
November 2013

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Patenting Their Discoveries Does Not Pay Off for Most Universities, a Study Says

November 26, 2013

By Richard Pérez-Peña for The New York Times

Universities try to cash in on discoveries — gene splicing, brain chemistry, computer-chip design — but the great majority of them fail to turn their research into a source of income, according to a new study from the Brookings Institution.

Research universities have “technology transfer” offices that make thousands of business deals annually for the use of their patents. But in any given year, at about seven of eight universities, the resulting revenue funneled into university budgets is not even enough to cover the cost of running that office, said the study’s author, Walter D. Valdivia.

Check:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/21/education/patenting-their-discoveries-does-not-pay-off-for-most-universities-a-study-says.html?_r=0

http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2013/11/university-start-ups-technology-transfer-valdivia

Povl Tiedemann
November 2013

How do students choose where to study? (Philip Warwick)

November 26, 2013

Extracts in GlobalEd by By Mark Thomas, Associate Dean at Grenoble Ecole de Management

Autumn is the time of year when many newspapers and journals produce their university league tables.

For example, September saw the publication of the Financial Times (FT) Business Education Supplement, and in the UK the Sunday Times Good University Guide, offering different takes on where to study.

These two are targeted at very different audiences.

The Sunday Times Guide is aimed at parents as much as students, recognising that parents have a significant stake in the decision making process that leads to undergraduate study choices, whilst the FT Supplement is written for mainly for business people intent on furthering their careers, by making a shrewd investment in a Masters level qualification.

Check:

http://globaleduc.wordpress.com/2013/11/25/how-do-students-choose-where-to-study-philip-warwick/#more-11174

Povl Tiedemann
November 2013

IMD – Criterion of the Month: How much household consumption do you need?

November 21, 2013

By Stephane Garelli, Professor, Director, IMD World Competitiveness Center

In many advanced economies, household consumption expenditure – the criterion of this month – is a key engine for growth. It represents 70.9% of the GDP in the US and 65.8% in the UK.

But the good news can turn bad if such a large contributor to the GDP suddenly stalls because of excessive personal debt or fear for the future. For example, in Japan, successive governments have tried to stimulate household expenditures (60.9% of the GDP) without much success, until now.

In emerging economies, an over reliance on household consumption can also be a time bomb: it represents more than 70% of the GDP in Ukraine, Philippines, Greece, Turkey and Jordan – without much industrial investments and exports on the revenue side.

China on the other hand shows a meagre 34.9% of the GDP in household consumption, and an over reliance on investments.

A sound economy balances both private consumption and the production of wealth. In short you should mainly spend what you have earned: so obvious as a statement, and so widely disregarded…

Check:
http://www.imd.org/wcc/criterion-of-the-month/

Check earlier release on Competitiveness in Perspective
from IMD World Competitiveness Center:

http://www.imd.org/uupload/IMD.WebSite/wcc/WCYResults/3/Perspective1997-2013.pdf

Povl Tiedemann
November 2013

Diversification key to international higher education

November 20, 2013

By Rahul Choudaha in University World News

Last week’s Open Doors report shows growth in international student numbers coming to the United States. But a closer look at the statistics demonstrates that many are from just a handful of countries and are concentrated in certain types of institution. US universities need to diversify their international policy better in order to plan for the long term.

International student mobility is a complex phenomenon with multiple variables interacting at the national, institutional and individual level. A deeper understanding of student mobility trends can help in not only shaping effective national policies but also informed institutional strategies.

Check:

http://test.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20131113074658869

http://www.iie.org/Research-and-Publications/Open-Doors

http://www.iie.org/~/media/Files/Corporate/Open-Doors/Open-Doors-Briefing-November-2013.ashx

Povl Tiedemann
November 2013

Peter Drucker Forum 2013 conclusions on complexity

November 19, 2013

Extracts in GlobalEd by Mark Thomas, Associate Dean at Grenoble Ecole de Management.

Summary remarks by Pierre Hessler, Chairman’s delegate at Capgemini, on the Peter Drucker Forum 2013: “What Would Drucker Say Now?; What Have We Learned?” The concluding discussion.

Pierre Hessler brings the conference to an end by concluding that we should celebrate complexity, rather than mourn it. More and more products and services of companies will remain connected to the company, sending back information. This is a fact we should celebrate.

Check:
http://globaleduc.wordpress.com/2013/11/15/peter-drucker-forum-2013-what-would-drucker-say-now-what-have-we-learned-concluding-discussion/#more-11138

Povl Tiedemann
November 2013

Shanghai Statement – ‘The Future of Higher Education’

November 17, 2013

From University World News

Following their first global meeting in Shanghai earlier this month, 33 higher education research and policy experts from around the world published the ‘Shanghai Statement’ calling for:

• greater intellectual input,
• data,
• policy analysis,
• professional training

for the world’s expanding and increasingly important higher education sector.

Check further information and statement:
http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20131114185952850

From earlier release in University World News By Bianka Siwinska:

First global meeting of HE research centres

The directors of higher education research centres from around the world flew to Shanghai for their first ever global meeting last weekend (2-3 November) and, encouragingly, policy-makers also attended.

The aims were to discuss the future of research on higher education, to debate common issues – and to create a global network of higher education research experts.

The “International Higher Education Research and Policy Roundtable” was organised by the Center for International Higher Education, or CIHE, at Boston College in the United States, and held from 2-3 November.

It was hosted by the Graduate School of Education at Shanghai Jiaotong University and supported by the Innovation, Higher Education and Research for Development, or IHERD, programme of SIDA, the Swedish International Development Agency.

Participants discussed links between researchers and policy-makers in the field of higher education, and the nature and character of those links.

Check:
http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20131108105825994

Povl Tiedemann
November 2013

EUA “TRENDS 2015” project to map key HE developments in Europe

November 17, 2013

From EUA Newsletter 20

The European University Association is launching the 7th in the series of its flagship TRENDS projects, which undertake a detailed analysis and mapping of developments in Europe’s changing higher education landscape.

Check:
http://www.eua.be/News/13-11-14/EUA_TRENDS_2015_project_to_map_key_HE_developments_in_Europe.aspx

Povl Tiedemann
November 2013

LTGA calibration on bond management – has Solvency II reached a deadlock?

November 16, 2013

From EDHEC Research Highlights, No. 39

A new EDHEC study shows that LTGA calibration continues to favour short-duration bonds and could undermine the financial stability and financing of both sovereigns and corporates

This new study, conducted jointly by the EDHEC Financial Analysis and Accounting Research Centre and the EDHEC-Risk Institute, and supported by Russell Investments as part of the research chair at EDHEC-Risk Institute on “Solvency II”, analyses the effect of the new LTGA spread risk calibration on bond management.

Check:

http://faculty-research.edhec.com/research/edhec-publications/2013/ltga-impact-assessment-and-bond-management-has-solvency-ii-reached-a-deadlock–190144.kjsp

http://professoral.edhec.com/mailing/drd/rh/1311/en/index.html

Povl Tiedemann
November 2013

Peter Drucker Forum 2013: “Innovation and Scale in Complex Times” by John Hagel III

November 14, 2013

By Mark Thomas, Associate Dean at Grenoble Ecole de Management – in GlobalEd

At the Peter Drucker Forum 2013 John Hagel III argued that our business environment is becoming more complex. This complexity is increasing over time and demands very different approaches in order to sustain success.

Due to the constant increase in complexity in recent times, it is necessary for executives to expand their focus on innovation and in particular need to include institutional innovation into their thinking.

This includes re-thinking our fundamental rationale and the rationale of our institutions as well as investigating the architecture of relationships required to support this evolving rationale.

Check:
http://globaleduc.wordpress.com/2013/11/14/10903/#more-10903

Povl Tiedemann
November 2013