Archive for December, 2017

Are branch campuses improving students’ employability?

December 31, 2017

By Christine Lee – in University World News.

International branch campuses are facing questions about their sustainability. It’s a good point to ask their students about their perceptions of how they prepare them for the jobs market and to what extent they can tap the experience of teachers from the parent university.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20171213123146413

Povl Tiedemann
December 2017

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The languages strategy is an important first step

December 30, 2017

By Hanne Leth Andersen – in University World News.

The Danish government’s national languages strategy is much needed to address the plummeting take-up of languages. For universities a key task is to integrate language skills in foreign languages other than English into other courses and to develop local languages strategies with municipalities.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20171216043423348

Povl Tiedemann
December 2017

Sectorally mobile researchers are ‘change agents’

December 29, 2017

By Jan Petter Myklebust – in University World News.

Danish universities need to do more to promote sectoral mobility of researchers, which fosters increased innovation, knowledge turnover, technological development and relevance for research and education, according to the findings of a major investigation by the Danish Council for Research and Innovation Policy.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20171215124817576

Povl Tiedemann
December 2017

A global recognition convention for academic mobility

December 28, 2017

By Stig Arne Skjerven and Einar Meier – in University World News.

The draft global convention on academic mobility will improve the rights of internationally mobile students, promote robust ethical quality assurance systems, contribute to building trust across borders and pave the way for increased global cooperation in higher education.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=2017121312573374

Povl Tiedemann
December 2017

The Strategic Decisions That Caused Nokia’s Failure

December 27, 2017

By Yves Doz – in INSEAD Knowledge.

The moves that led to Nokia’s decline paint a cautionary tale for successful firms.

In less than a decade, Nokia emerged from Finland to lead the mobile phone revolution. It rapidly grew to have one of the most recognisable and valuable brands in the world. At its height Nokia commanded a global market share in mobile phones of over 40 percent. While its journey to the top was swift, its decline was equally so, culminating in the sale of its mobile phone business to Microsoft in 2013.

Check:

https://knowledge.insead.edu/strategy/the-strategic-decisions-that-caused-nokias-failure-7766?utm_source=INSEAD+Knowledge&utm_campaign=c745205c3c-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_12_21&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_e079141ebb-c745205c3c-249976169

NB:

LEGO was on the verge of collapse in the early years of 2000,
due to similar systemic complexities.

Povl Tiedemann
December 2017

Should We Fear the Robot Revolution?

December 26, 2017

Vinika D. Rao – in INSEAD Knowledge.

The AI boom holds both utopian and dystopian possibilities that we may not yet be prepared for.

Changes wrought by new technologies are often regarded with suspicion in their time. Yet market economies have consistently transformed techno-shocks into long-term advantages for a wide swathe of society. This was true with electricity, the advent of the conveyor belt and even the first wave of the IT revolution. In most advanced economies, for example, armies of office workers have shrunk as a casualty of the computer revolution that began in the late 1960s. In 2017, few would reject the benefits that have arisen from eliminating rote tasks, such as filing and tapping out letters on temperamental typewriters.

However, the next wave of tech breakthroughs – AI, big data, and digitalisation – appears different in nature. While previous innovations have replaced routine tasks, they could not replace human cognitive tasks. Humans were necessary and technology helped make them more productive. The new wave – let’s call it “robot technology” – is different. Intelligent computers are capable of replacing human activities on a much broader scale. And this can lead to widespread changes in employment.

Check:

https://knowledge.insead.edu/blog/insead-blog/should-we-fear-the-robot-revolution-8011?utm_source=Content+Partners&utm_campaign=30fbbfe7da-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_602b84e75f-30fbbfe7da-250174109

Povl Tiedemann
December 2017

Universities accused of free speech clampdown

December 25, 2017

BY Areeb Ullah for Middle East Eye – in University World News.

British universities have been accused of threatening free speech on issues such as Palestine by insisting on tough yet ill-defined rules that events must be chaired by approved ‘independent’ moderators.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=2017120207441732

Povl Tiedemann
December 2017

Will this be a Chinese century in higher education?

December 23, 2017

From University World News.

While the United States and United Kingdom have made decisions that raise uncertainty over international cooperation and free movement of students, China is pushing to become a global leader in higher education – but will it push ‘Chinese characteristics’?

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20171216043754390

Povl Tiedemann
December 2017

Why China wants ‘Western-style’ liberal arts education

December 22, 2017

By Yojana Sharma – in University World News.

As Duke University in the United States prepares to set up an undergraduate liberal arts degree at its campus in Kunshan, China, and with other proposals by foreign universities for such programmes in the offing, China’s motivations for setting up ‘experimental’ liberal arts degrees are coming under scrutiny.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20171202052059445

Povl Tiedemann
December 2017

Higher education funding divide grows across Europe

December 21, 2017

By Brendan O’Malley – in University World News.

Since the 2008 financial crisis, the divide between higher education systems that increase public funding and those that reduce investment is getting wider in Europe, with recovery slow and fragile in many countries and with some still going backwards, a new report says.

Check:

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20171214081557556

Povl Tiedemann
December 2017